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HEALTH BENEFITS OF GINGER INTAKE


Gorgeousg
(@gorgeousg)
Estimable Member Moderator
Joined: 1 year ago
Posts: 211
Topic starter  

Ginger is a member of a plant family that includes cardamom and turmeric. The spicy aroma is mainly due to presence of ketones. The health benefits of this rhizome plant are:

  • It can support your immune system

Ginger contains gingerol, a compound that has antioxidant properties to help support your immunity. Try sipping ginger tea or making a gingery salad dressing for a quickie health boost.

  • It can reduce your risk of diabetes.

Scientists have linked some active compounds in ginger with improvements in insulin and metabolism. That said, if you’re at risk for diabetes, adding extra to food can help.

  • It helps with menstrual pain relief

Out of all of the research done on ginger’s pain-relieving properties, results show it helps with menstrual pain the most. Sipping ginger tea can also soothe nausea during that time of the month.

  • It is an anti-inflammatory

Like other produce, nuts, seeds, beans and whole grains, ginger contains antioxidant-like compounds called phytonutrients that may reduce cell damage. The root can also prevent inflammation from starting by reducing cell-signaling activity. With that in mind, adding ginger to already good-for-you, nutrient-dense meals is the key to unlocking those properties.

  • It can settle an upset stomach.

The idea that ginger can help with some light tummy trouble isn’t new. In fact, research has linked multiple digestive benefits to ginger, specifically acting on parts of your GI tract responsible for feelings of nausea, stomach upset, and vomiting. It may also help move food from the stomach to the small intestine for digestion and absorption. That said, ginger cannot prevent food poisoning or counteract ingestion of a harmful substance, so contact your physician ASAP if something requires urgent medical attention.

  • It may help prevent heart disease.

The same anti-inflammatory compounds in ginger can also reduce the risk of chronic disease. A 2019 review found that ginger can lower blood pressure and decrease blood lipids (fats) levels, both of which help protect against heart disease, and a 2016 review linked regular ginger intake with lower cholesterol and blood sugar compared to a placebo. But just like diabetes, eating ginger can’t offset an otherwise poor diet high in saturated fat and added sugar. You’ll still have to consume more veggies, 100% whole grains, lean proteins, fish, legumes, and beans in order to reduce your risk.

  • It may lower your risk of cancer.

The cell-protecting properties of ginger can lower the long-term risk of certain cancers. That’s because the spice and other flavorings may reduce cellular activity that causes DNA changes, cell death, and proliferation of cancer cells. It could also help sensitize tumors to treatments like chemo and radiation. While ginger’s not a cure-all for any chronic disease, using it regularly with loads of other spices and plant-based foods can help benefit health overall.

  • It can help you lose weight.

Some small studies have linked ginger intake — when combined with other plant extracts — to some benefits in weight loss. And there’s definitely some promising animal research linking ginger to weight management. But as with anything else, ginger is no magic weight-loss pill! Other components of a healthy, balanced diet matter just as much when it comes to losing weight and keeping it off.

  • It can also curb morning sickness.

And speaking of an upset stomach, pregnant women in particular should take note: Ginger may help reduce symptoms of morning sickness! In fact, research supports the safety and efficacy of ginger during pregnancy, with some improvement in symptoms when compared to a placebo. One 2018 study found that moms-to-be who consumed 1g of fresh ginger root per day for four days experienced a significant decrease in nausea and vomiting and no risk for the mother or her future baby.”

This topic was modified 1 month ago 3 times by Gorgeousg

Pharm G


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Lover Boy
(@lover-boy)
Trusted Member Member
Joined: 3 months ago
Posts: 71
 

How about Ginger tea, does it perform the same function since it's processed?

Ever since I learned about the redpill, I no longer greet women. I see women as an object of fun, please don't judge me. You will understand better if you were in my shoes.


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Kriss
(@kriss)
Reputable Member Moderator
Joined: 2 years ago
Posts: 516
 
Posted by: @gorgeousg

Ginger is a member of a plant family that includes cardamom and turmeric. The spicy aroma is mainly due to presence of ketones. The health benefits of this rhizome plant are:

  • It can support your immune system

Ginger contains gingerol, a compound that has antioxidant properties to help support your immunity. Try sipping ginger tea or making a gingery salad dressing for a quickie health boost.

  • It can reduce your risk of diabetes.

Scientists have linked some active compounds in ginger with improvements in insulin and metabolism. That said, if you’re at risk for diabetes, adding extra to food can help.

  • It helps with menstrual pain relief

Out of all of the research done on ginger’s pain-relieving properties, results show it helps with menstrual pain the most. Sipping ginger tea can also soothe nausea during that time of the month.

  • It is an anti-inflammatory

Like other produce, nuts, seeds, beans and whole grains, ginger contains antioxidant-like compounds called phytonutrients that may reduce cell damage. The root can also prevent inflammation from starting by reducing cell-signaling activity. With that in mind, adding ginger to already good-for-you, nutrient-dense meals is the key to unlocking those properties.

  • It can settle an upset stomach.

The idea that ginger can help with some light tummy trouble isn’t new. In fact, research has linked multiple digestive benefits to ginger, specifically acting on parts of your GI tract responsible for feelings of nausea, stomach upset, and vomiting. It may also help move food from the stomach to the small intestine for digestion and absorption. That said, ginger cannot prevent food poisoning or counteract ingestion of a harmful substance, so contact your physician ASAP if something requires urgent medical attention.

  • It may help prevent heart disease.

The same anti-inflammatory compounds in ginger can also reduce the risk of chronic disease. A 2019 review found that ginger can lower blood pressure and decrease blood lipids (fats) levels, both of which help protect against heart disease, and a 2016 review linked regular ginger intake with lower cholesterol and blood sugar compared to a placebo. But just like diabetes, eating ginger can’t offset an otherwise poor diet high in saturated fat and added sugar. You’ll still have to consume more veggies, 100% whole grains, lean proteins, fish, legumes, and beans in order to reduce your risk.

  • It may lower your risk of cancer.

The cell-protecting properties of ginger can lower the long-term risk of certain cancers. That’s because the spice and other flavorings may reduce cellular activity that causes DNA changes, cell death, and proliferation of cancer cells. It could also help sensitize tumors to treatments like chemo and radiation. While ginger’s not a cure-all for any chronic disease, using it regularly with loads of other spices and plant-based foods can help benefit health overall.

  • It can help you lose weight.

Some small studies have linked ginger intake — when combined with other plant extracts — to some benefits in weight loss. And there’s definitely some promising animal research linking ginger to weight management. But as with anything else, ginger is no magic weight-loss pill! Other components of a healthy, balanced diet matter just as much when it comes to losing weight and keeping it off.

  • It can also curb morning sickness.

And speaking of an upset stomach, pregnant women in particular should take note: Ginger may help reduce symptoms of morning sickness! In fact, research supports the safety and efficacy of ginger during pregnancy, with some improvement in symptoms when compared to a placebo. One 2018 study found that moms-to-be who consumed 1g of fresh ginger root per day for four days experienced a significant decrease in nausea and vomiting and no risk for the mother or her future baby.”

Ginger is undoubtedly a very good medicinal plant with many health benefits. My only problem with it is the taste. I don't like the taste at all 😥😥


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Gorgeousg
(@gorgeousg)
Estimable Member Moderator
Joined: 1 year ago
Posts: 211
Topic starter  

@lover-boy like you said its processed, better the fresh one if available.  Although, they all work for similar purpose

Pharm G


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Gorgeousg
(@gorgeousg)
Estimable Member Moderator
Joined: 1 year ago
Posts: 211
Topic starter  

@kriss Yeah, a lot of people complain about that as well. I also do not like it as first when growing up but got to understand its benefit and started taking it. Presently, I use ginger in majority of my foods.

Pharm G


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